?

Log in

No account? Create an account
sledding

Three Magic Numbers

First of all, our magic numbers have to be odd, because even numbers are unlucky. That's because they're always divisible by two. They're like horrible mirrors that double reality, creating empty simulacra.

Secondly, they need to be prime, so nine is out, since it can be divided into three sets of three.

Eleven is out because we would look funny with eleven fingers. That would mean six fingers on one hand and five on the other. It's too bad, because eleven would have been a cool magic number.

That leaves us with three, our first magic number. We knew it was a magic number because Schoolhouse Rock already told us ... but what they didn't tell us is that its multiples contain all the numerals:

30
21
12
3
24
15
6
27
18
9

I used the lowest number, with the exception of zero, for each example. Isn't it cool how the second and third (21, 12), when you add the numerals, both equal three. The fifth and the sixth (24, 15) give six, while the eighth and ninth (27, 18) both make 9.

(Poor even numbers, their multiples can never be odd, but odd numbers' multiples can be even - half of them are) It therefore follows that if the set of your multiples contains numbers whose last digits include all possible numerals (0-9), then you are eligible to be a magic number.

Which other number is magic? Yep, you guessed it: seven:

70
21
42
63
14
35
56
7
28
49

What about numbers like 13 and 17? They can't be magic because they're too big. Imagine how we'd look with 13 fingers? It might help when it came time to play Thelonious Monk chords on the the piano, but other than that, those extra fingers would just be a burden.

So there's only two magic numbers? DIdn't I say there were three? Aha. The third is five. But how could five be a magic number, if its multiples end only in zero and five? (5, 10, 15, 20, etc.)

We'll we have to imagine that we have six fingers on each hand. If that were the case, as Schoolhouse Rock tells us, we probably wouldn't use base 10 as our system, we would use base 12, which might look something like this: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, #, &, 10. (# = 10, and & = 11). What we know as "12" would be written "10." Now five is a magic number:

21 (25)
42 (50)
13 (15)
34 (40)
5 (5)
26 (30)
47 (55)
18 (20)
39 (45)
# (10)
2& (35)
50 (60)

In base 12, three plays the role that five plays in base ten:

3, 6, 9, 10, 13, 16, 19, 20, 23, 26, 29, 30, etc. I'd would be really easy for six-fingered kids to count by threes.

Thus, the three magic numbers are three, five and seven.

In the Jewish Tetragrammaton, the name of God has four letters:



This couldn't be very lucky.

In English, however, "God" has three letters. And so he is probably luckier and more magic.

When translated into Spanish or French, we're back to four letters: Dios and Dieu. Ergo, we can surmise that God is an English speaker. Too bad all those people who pray in Spanish and French can't be heard. Their prayers just sound like gibberish to God.

Comments

sledding

November 2017

S M T W T F S
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Tags

Powered by LiveJournal.com